February Book Releases and Books on Sale!

Devil cover adult

February was a busy month for me. So many awesome things happened with my acquisitions at Entangled that I’ll probably have to split it into a few posts!

First, Nicola Davidson’s The Devil’s Submission, a femme dom Regency novella, and the follow-up to Surrender to Sin, released!  Smart Bitches, Trashy Books loved it and gave it an A-grade for good reason, so check out the rave review and go get your copy, because it’s $1.99. The Fallen Series is perfect for fans of feminist romance-driven erotica with a little kink, a lot of heat, and headstrong women who know what they want.ioe-cover

Island of Exiles by Erica Cameron also released! This one is a young adult fantasy thriller that’s unlike anything you’ve ever read, and incredibly compelling. So compelling, in fact, that it earned a Kirkus star, a prestigious designation for books of exceptional merit, and they called it a “rare gem of a book.” Here’s what they had to say:Kirkus review

Island of Exiles was also announced as a Junior JLG certificateLibrary Guild selection. This is yet another mark of how compelling and thrilling this book is. And if fancy credentials aren’t enough to make you want a copy, let me convince you: I loved Island of Exiles because it’s an intense survival thriller, which is always exciting to me especially if it’s this well done. I also loved how huge and wild and real the world is–I felt like I’d left my own world completely behind when I read this one. It’s so real, it hurt to come back. And for all its complexity and richness, at its heart it’s a story of a soldier girl out to rescue her brother at any cost, in a world where siblings don’t really exist. Right now you can get the paperback for $7.40, so run for it, and check it out on Amazon Barnes and Noble Goodreads or Indiebound

final-cover-abby

Completely different from those first two, Any Boy But You by Julie Hammerle also released in February! It’s the first in her North Pole, Minnesota series, set in a Stars-Hollow-like town that’s a Christmas tourist village–in North Pole, it’s Christmas 365 days a year. And this first installment is You’ve Got Mail meets Pokemon Go. Bitter rivalry between the town’s two family-run sporting goods stores means Elena and Oliver can’t ever fall for each other–unless maybe they already have, and don’t even know it. At $2.99 for the ebook, you can’t go wrong with this escapist, heartwarming, funny read.

Amazon Barnes and Noble Goodreads Indiebound

And finally, Julie Hammerle’s brilliant debut, The Sound of Us, went on sale! It’s Pitch Perfect at opera camp, and it’s so nerdy you’ll love it. Every chapter starts with a tweet, and they tell their own little story, too. It’s one of the funniest, most human voices I’ve read in a long time, and it’s all about female friendship and discovering your passions and owning who you are. Kirkus Reviews also loved it, and since the paperback is on sale for less than $4, you don’t want to miss out on this brilliant debut. SOU graphic

Amazon Barnes and Noble Goodreads Indiebound

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Opening for Interns at Entangled Publishing

I’m looking for two new interns to work with me at Entangled Publishing, mostly with Entangled Teen but also with single-title adult romance and category romance. This is a remote, unpaid internship.

Entangled uses Macmillan Publishers distribution to help sell our books. They help us reach over 120 countries, where we sell our English versions of the works. As a New York “big five,” Macmillan is a huge distributor in the industry and allows us to have significant reach with our titles. Entangled print books also reach Barnes & Noble, Books-A-Million, and many other bookstores, and we have a list of over 60+ USA Today and New York Times bestsellers as well as RITA award winners.

Applicants for the internship should have 8-10 hours per week available, though the internship is somewhat flexible. In addition, applications should be:

  • well-read across the genres in YA especially, as well as adult romance
  • a fast reader
  • able to appreciate romantic fiction of most sub-genres
  • open to reading explicit adult romance
  • seriously interested in publishing as a career
  • able to think critically about story and character

Tasks include helping to read submissions, proofreading galleys, writing reader reports, researching comparison titles, and editing associated materials for client work.

To apply, please email a resume and cover letter detailing your reading interests (including top 5 favorite recent reads), available time per week, and related experience to katebrauning@entangledpublishing.com

Fiction Writers’ Boot Camp 2015- I’m hosting a conference!

Hello, friends!

I have been in a black hole of editing, drafting, revising, conferences, and travel for family. Just in case you want the details, between a family reunion on both sides of the family, conferences, and travel for my novel that released last November, this year I’ve been to New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Minneapolis twice, Dallas, Chicago, New York, Arkansas twice, Colorado, Mexico, and Nebraska. I also moved from Iowa to South Dakota last month. This month, I’ll be going to Indiana for the Midwest Writers Workshop, where I’ll be both attending to learn, helping present a session on pitching your manuscript, and taking pitches myself for Entangled Publishing. I’ve also drafted a new manuscript, revised it, and worked through edits with my agent on a third manuscript. Add that to moving into an acquiring position at Entangled and working with my clients on ten released/soon-to-be-releasing titles, and that’s why I haven’t had time to tell you here…

I’m hosting a two-day conference in Sioux Center, IA. It’s a small conference, focused on one-on-one mentorship. New York Times bestselling authors Tosca Lee and Nicole Baart, myself, and library director Becky Bilby will be presenting lectures, workshops, discussion panels, and networking sessions on everything new and debut authors need to know: marketing, platform building, story structure, character development, writing dark fiction, publishing paths, revising and editing, and more. Attendees will also have the chance to schedule a private consultation with me, where they can pitch a completed MS to Entangled, receive a query critique, and get personalized career advice and have their questions answered.

It’s been an awesomely fun thing to create and promote this conference, and I’m so excited to try my hand at supporting new and debut authors in the way that so many others helped support me. We’re already almost at capacity, but I wanted to tell you-all about it, since you’ve been following me from the beginning. Register in the next 10 days, and you can still attend!

Another cool thing? It’s free for teen writers! If you’re 19 years of age or under, you may attend at no cost. For adults, the cost is $80. Next year it won’t be this inexpensive, so it’s a great year to come join the fun, learn everything I wish I’d known as a querying and debut author, and challenge yourself on both the craft and business of writing. Writers of all skill levels are encouraged to attend– sessions will contain advanced material, but no writer is too new for this conference. I’d love to see you there! And if you can’t make it this year, help me spread the word?

And beware. It’s intense! Check out the speakers, schedule of events, and more on the conference website below.

Fiction Writers’ Bootcamp

The Manuscript, Edit Letters, & Deadlines: Thoughts from an Author/Editor

I originally wrote this post for Adventures in YA Publishing as part of my blog tour for my book release– I wrote about 30 posts that went up on different sites over November and December, and with all that content out there, I’d like to keep it all in one place, so I’m posting it here for archiving purposes–and just in case it’s useful to my readers here.

Across the Desk: Thoughts from An Author-Editor by Kate Brauning

Hello, Adventurers! It’s Kate Brauning here, and I’m finding myself in an interesting position this year. I’ve worked in publishing for about four years now (still just learning), and as a freelance editor and an editor with first Month9Books and now Entangled Publishing, I’ve worked with a lot of clients on a lot of books. But just this past November, my debut novel released. I’ve been working toward being an author since I was a teen, so this is really a dream come true for me—but it also means I’m on the receiving end of what I’ve been handing out to my clients. Because I’m getting to see across the desk a bit, I’m here to chat about how editors and authors see the same issues.

The Manuscript:

Author:  When my agent first offered me representation, and when the offer for How We Fall came through, I was so nervous. What if they didn’t love my book as much as they said? What if they liked my book, but not me? And what if later on, my book got lost in the shuffle? Of course, I worried through all these things with my critique partners (and my poor agent), and I’ve seen the same fears go around in the writing community. They’re pretty normal concerns—and it’s great for authors when an editor recognizes that and reaches out to help stabilize those concerns. My own editor has made a point to congratulate me on good news and keep up with issues, even though we’re long past edits, and it really helps assure me that they still love my book and they’re working hard to make sure it does the best it can.

Editor: In my experience, an editor will almost never acquire a book he or she doesn’t love. Publishing is a business, but it’s a business that requires passion. We have to advocate so hard and so long for our books, and even read them 6+ times, that it’s not smart business to acquire a book we don’t genuinely love. And it’s not smart business to work with an author we can’t work with, either. We love you and your book, and even if we have other books and authors on our lists, working hard for your book is what we signed up for.

Editorial Letters:

Author: Getting your editorial letter can be exciting and terrifying. It can be tough to hear what needs to be improved in our books—chances are we’ve been through multiple heavy rounds of revisions already. We may even be working a newer project that has grabbed us. Switching back and forth between projects can be tough, and along with handling the editorial letter itself and knowing how to apply the changes our editor is asking for, comes the insecurity of wondering how much our editor could really love the book if it has all these flaws. Positive comments and support are really helpful to us, both in the edit letter and in general, even just to help us know that yes, this part works. (If my editor sends me an encouraging note or tells me something she loves about my book, it makes my day.) Editorial letters can even be confusing, or contain notes that we might agree with, but can’t see how to apply. When revising How We Fall, I had notes I knew how to apply, but it meant I had to make other changes I didn’t know if my editor would like. Beyond being stressful, those edits can raise a lot of questions and tough issues.

Editor: A good editor breaks down both what works and what needs to be sharper in a manuscript. I want my clients to know the positives in the story so they can see why I love it, to help them see the book in a balanced manner, and to help offset how tough it can be to hear what needs to change. But it’s also the editor’s job to point out what needs cleaning up and sharpening. A heavy edit doesn’t mean we don’t like the book or that we think you did a lousy job revising. We’re working hard on your book because we love it. We’re helping you figure out how to get your vision on the page. It’s tough to see your own work objectively—we know that. It can be hard to see your own way out of plot or character issues. And we know you’ve been over this book many times, and it gets harder and harder to tell what’s working and what isn’t. Our focus is on balancing all that out and helping you make this book the best it can be. Because we love it. We’d be doing our jobs poorly and harming both the book and your career if we weren’t honest, so believe the compliments we give you, because we mean them! And if you need clarification or want to discuss ideas, let your editor know. We actually prefer it! We don’t want you floundering and confused. Definitely reply to the edit letter, after you’ve had the chance to think about it. We want to know what you’re thinking about the notes, and if you have questions or if the notes bring up other issues. We’re doing this with you.

Deadlines:

Author: Sometimes I need a good, tight deadline to really make me tackle revisions. If I can dabble at it, it probably won’t get done. My revision rounds for How We Fall were incredibly tight timing, and I basically lived in my book until they were done. And my critique partners and writer friends went through the same thing when their edits came. Sometimes it went just fine and we tackled those revisions and got them sent off on time. But sometimes the deadlines went over a child or spouse’s birthday, or we got sick, or had crises at day jobs. Even more often, we floundered with how to apply the editorial notes, or discovered more that needed to be revised once we dug in. A caffeine-fueled, sleep-deprived stupor doesn’t make for smart, thorough revisions. But can you tell an editor that? Can you ask for an extension, or does that make you a “difficult author”? Should we tough it out, or talk to our editor?

Editor: Deadlines are a necessary part of the publication process, and it can cause problems with production and vendors if we have to move them around too much. However, we know you’re human, and life happens. I don’t know of anyone who would label an author “difficult” if a problem crops up during edits. The earlier you let us know, the better. It’s much easier to adjust earlier on than a few days before your deadline. Honest, upfront communication with your editor is always best. Of course, your editor may say, “sorry, there’s a big immovable reason we need it by X date,” but we’ll usually try to work with you! Rushed edits from a stressed author usually aren’t the author’s best work, and we want those revisions to be solid. The key is to communicate with us. We’ll try to reply in kind, and work out the issue together. It’s what we’re here for!

Communication, really, is one of the biggest things I’ve learned from seeing both sides of the desk. Honest, open communication. Be respectful of your editor’s time, of course, and realize they have other clients they need to be fair to, too, but communicate. Ask the questions you have. Editors sometimes don’t realize what it is you might not know. Get clarification on edits—they’re trusting that if you’re confused, you’ll come back to them. They want you to! Great books take collaboration, and both the author and the editor are in this together, to make that book the best it can be and to help it reach its audience.

My Twitter Pitch Guidelines

I’m participating in several Twitter pitch contests this year, and I’m looking for great YA, NA, and adult submissions.

If I favorite your pitch, it means I’m requesting material from you. Please send the query and three chapters if I favorite your pitch. Use “Twitter Pitch Request: TITLE” as the subject, and send to katebrauning@entangledpublishing.com

I work primarily with YA and NA, and very selectively with adult. MG, nonfiction, and picture books aren’t for me. Entangled accepts submissions from both agented and unagented authors.

For who I am and how to submit to me, please use the “about Kate” and “submit” pages above.

Cover Reveal for ANOMALY by Tonya Kuper from Entangled Teen

 

Today my wicked-talented friend Tonya Kuper is revealing her book cover! Entangled Teen is releasing ANOMALY in November 4, 2014! I couldn’t be more thrilled for Tonya, and you HAVE to to check out the awesome cover, and enter to win an eARC!

On to the reveal!

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Isn’t it gorgeous? And I can tell you, the story lives up to the cover. Prepare for this to be a big one, guys.

 

About the Book 

Title: ANOMALY (Schrodinger’s Consortium #1)

Author: Tonya Kuper

Publisher: Entangled Teen

Pub. Date: November 4, 2014

Pages: 400

Find it: GoodreadsAmazon

 

What if the world isn’t what we think?

What if reality is only an illusion?

What if you were one of the few who could control it?

Yeah, Josie Harper didn’t believe it, either, until strange things started happening. And when this hot guy tried to kidnap her, shouting about ultimate observers and pushing and consortiums hell-bent on controlling the world… Well, that’s when things got real. Now Josie’s got it bad for a boy who weakens her every time he’s near and a world of enemies on her tail who want to control her gift, so yeah, she’s going to need more than just her wits if she hopes to survive much longer.

Einstein never saw this coming…

 

About Tonya:

YA scifi author of ANOMALY, out 11/14, Entangled Teen. Represented by Nicole Resciniti. Contributor at yastands.blogspot.com & allthewritenotes.com. Music freak. Chocolate addict.

Giveaway Details:


1 eARC of ANOMALY International

a Rafflecopter giveaway